The Everyday Marksman

Community Hub

\\\ The Forum

EDC Car Kit  

  RSS

Cutright
(@cutright)
Member Community Founder
855 Brass
Challenges: emergency shelter challenge level 1
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 40
16/11/2019 5:11 pm  

Hello fellas. I had a smooth hour to burn today...arrived an hour early to my rendezvous so I thought I'd share what I keep in the car on the daily.

Before we get into that I want explain my situation, because that's what dictates the equipment. I drive a Ford Escape. It's a two wheel drive, 4 cylinder and can get up and go for city and highway driving. While not all wheel drive, it clears higher water levels and some irregular surfaces a bit better than a car.

I'm in St. Louis county, 20 minutes from the Arch and 40 minutes from being in huge deciduous forests. Im a do-all kind of guy who is suburban but ventures into both city and rural areas regularly.

So with all that being said, I can experience anything from riots and the city being burnt down to simply a tree fallen across a road with no help coming.

I pack a come-a-long (cheap ratcheting winch), tow strap, car starter, one of those now extinct genuine all wool Italian blankets and a few small tools in the back. It's just common stuff that solves common issues.

The interesting stuff is what is out of sight or looks mundane.

Flickr

title="20191116_151654"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_151654"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49079724398/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_151654"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49079724398_3c39f5ce7d_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_151654"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Four items that remain in the care at all times are a Gerber entrenching tool, a Ontario SPAX, Gerber multitool and Gerber ASAK (I think it's an ASAK at least). So a shovel, chopper with egress and fire hydrant and oxygen wrenches built in, a fixed blade capable of egress and a multitool.

Flickr

title="20191116_151908"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_151908"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080464762/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_151908"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080464762_ef51a27014_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_151908"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

It should be mentioned that I dont intend on using any of it in my car. It's not accessible and I value their concealibility over accessibility due to the goings on of an urban environment.

Also, due to the threat of theft, all of these tools are quality, but not chosen as the ideal tool for the job....they were all gotten cheap, either on sale or like new military surplus. I wouldn't buy camo anything, ESPECIALLY NOT ACU, if I could keep from it but I have less than $100 in these tools.

Keeping with the theme of low signature, I chose a completely generic Eddie Bauer computer backpack that's on par with any 24 hour assault pack for size. It's a crap pack capable of not falling apart for the rough 24 hours it will take to get home or bunker down and that's what its for, getting home.

Flickr

title="20191116_152028"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152028"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49079723698/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_152028"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49079723698_0f8077fcbe_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152028"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

The outermost pouch contain the two items I'll most likely use on the daily, a flashlight and multitool. The flashlight is a Streamlight Polytac, a great performer in its price range. I like the 10 tap programmable version as I can get high, low and strobe...for throwing sweet rave parties. The multitool is a Leatherman Charge in titanium. It was a gift and has been a great little performer for a few years now.

Flickr

title="20191116_152150"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152150"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080465267/in/photostream/" title="20191116_152150"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080465267_2aeb7a80cd_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152150"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

In the middle zipper is a Carona saw, highly recommended by the guys out at Sigma III Survival and a good friend of mine Justin Williams. Not sure if they're still made but they're a good tool and cut green wood way out of their size and price point. A pair of leather gloves is pretty great as gloves, a knee pad, or insulater. Some tarred bank line, approximately 120 feet. I've only ever used it to keep a Christmas tree on the roof rack...and that's how it should stay I hope.

Flickr

title="20191116_152306"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152306"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080260876/in/photostream/" title="20191116_152306"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080260876_9c47dd2bf1_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152306"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

The interesting component here is the pouch. It's my "Oh Shit" kit as it solves most problems that make me say it. The pouch itself is a Spec-Ops something or other but it can be used in conjunction with a belt, a length of cord can be added and it slung or it can be attached to webbing. I especially like it as it fits in a smock pocket.

Flickr

title="20191116_152647"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152647"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49079730283/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_152653"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49079730283_5141e694e5_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152653"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js"

Flickr

title="20191116_152622"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152622"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080259036/in/photostream/" title="20191116_152622"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080259036_c8fd568d7b_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152622"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Flickr

title="20191116_152812"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152812"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080462177/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_152812"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080462177_17042824d2_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_152812"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Flickr

title="20191116_153214"><img src=" " width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_153214"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49079726923/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_153214"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49079726923_7426661ba4_b.jpg" width="768" height="1024" alt="20191116_153214"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Within an included Aloksak (it's a super duper waterproof ziplock bag really) is a few items. The spark light kit is a great little emergency fire kit that works in all altitudes. It's basically just a sparkler and comes with some compressed fiber bundles that you fluff up. I use them up and replace with good ol' petro jelly and cottonballs.

Theres a few feet of orange duct tape: chest seal, general repair, and flammable.

A sewing kit: a few needles and around 20 feet of thread kept attached to a popsicle stick.

A 2×3 signal mirror: get a good one if you're going to drop the money on it. Glass is preffered.

Brass wire: 15 ft. of 26 gauge wire for snares and repairs.

Can opener: A P-51? The bigger of the two versions. I'm never missing the opportunity for chow if its available.

A Fresnel lense: a back up to the back up fire source but also great for seeing splinters and small stuff.

Ranger band/bike inner tube: it burns. Period.

Micropure water sterilizer: probly expired by now but I'll take my chances over not having them.

Batteries: 6 AAA batteries to feed that headlamp. That's enough to run it for 24 hours, give or take. At least full blast throughout the night.

Fox Micro whistle: that sucker is the lightest, smallest, loudest, pea-less whistle. Its tiny and works.

Bandaids: for boo boos. And they burn.

Triangular bandage: cotton, burns, first aid, and insulation to the neck.

Nonstick bandage: bigger boo boos. Not sure if it burns.

In the rest of the pouch is a Victorinox Ranger (not sure of the model, 42 maybe?). I love it because its one hand opening, has a massive saw, cork screw for untying stubborn knots, an awl, and the other usual stuff. And the logo is the liner lock release.

The butane lighter in the Exotac cover waterproofs it and protects the head from cracking. I've been using them since they came out on Kickstarter and really love them for kayaking/river trips.

Lockpicks from South Ord. I'm not a pick snob, and there are some high quality manufacturers out there. If you get on their mailing list, they do run really good sales and I'd expect a huge one for this Black Friday. They do sell to the public and offer some practice lock setups if you're looking to get into it. I've used their products for 15 years and have saved myself and others hundreds of dollars by simply having a set on me.

The Suunto compass is a good one. I can't recall the model but it's adjustable for declination, has a mirror and a clear baseplate. I'm actually getting some training on navigation this weekend as I'm quite week in this field. There are lighter and better options but I wanted quality and accuracy for this bag.

The Aqua Pouch is a nice, small laminated water pouch that is zippable and has reinforced grommets. They're available from Survival Resources and that is a great company to acquire a lot of odds and ends from. County Comm would be another great resource for that matter.

A waterproof pad with an all steel Zebra pen is handy for notes. The pen is tough as nails and is quite strong...you can penetrate 1/2" dry wall.

150' of the 160 lb tarred bank line sits in the bottom as its just too handy and light to pack more.

Lastly is the Princeton Tec head lamp. This model has an actual off switch which is important because several models will drain the battery. Also, theres three levels of brightness and a red light for preserving night vision. And if you're sneaky sneaky, of course it's much less noticeable.

One last not about this pouch and it's contents is that I have a clone of it that is in my go bag. That's the bag that I'm grabbing and leaving the house with if there's a fire or local emergency. I can live out of it for a week and this pouch is a serious part of it. I also carry the shown pouch in my ruck when I backpack. It is a "survival pouch" I guess, but it's literally everything useful if I'm clothed and on the go.

Flickr

title="20191116_152437"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152437"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49079728653/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_152437"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49079728653_0f856d405c_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152437"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

In the main compartment of the bag is 2 liters of water in a 2 quart flexible surplus canteen. It works and it's cheap, AND if it freezes (which it will a bunch of times in the winter) it is flexible and wont crack like a metal container or Nalgene.

The S.O.S. rations are just a high calorie, decent tasting option that stays fresh in the car. I've tried them, among half a dozen others, and really prefer this version. They have a cinnamon version but I'm not big on it personally.

The good ol' blue 5x8 tarp. The Wal-Mart special...it keeps you off the ground changing a tire and works in a pinch for everything else.

Two trash bags round out emergency insulation, a poncho, or anything else you can imagine. Best of all, between the tarp and bags, you can nearly dispose of any mess you've ever made.

The last three items are medical: Emergency blizzard blanket, Medkit, and a Sam splint. The blanket is really cool, they're a brick when vacuum packed but opened up they're accordion folded, twin layered mylar that's aluminized like the space blankets. So there's trapped air in between the layers and it's really wide. There's an adhesive line down both sides so it will stick to a litter, sleeping pad or itself to make a mummy bag. It's surprisingly warm and can be found pretty cheap.

The Sam splint is foam covered aluminum that is made to be formed to the problematic area. Broken ankle and need to stabilize? Bingo. Neck brace? Broken anything? That's what it's for.

The medkit is based on my level of training, which is not terribly advanced and fairly novice. There's nothing in here that's ground breaking and because I'm a sissy about certain things, it's tailored to meet my needs...bandaids, tooth aches, stomach aches and diarrhea on top of bullet holes and trauma.

Flickr

title="20191116_152443"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152443"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080463767/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_152443"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080463767_02bd6176fa_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_152443"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

The pouch is a Condor of some sort that I've packed short trauma shears in the molle webbing and used some shock cord as a frog button to keep them in place. Within is eye wash, which irrigates wounds too, a trauma bandage that includes an eye cup/wound pressure plastic thingy...hard to explain, compressed gauze, ACE bandage (shockingly useful for all kinds of stuff), Benzoin tincture swab and steri-strips (I'm not sewing myself or anyone else up...use this instead), space blankey, duct tape, a small light from County Comm, 2 craveats, a nasal passage way (no lube, use your spit or their blood), and finally my boo boo kit.

Flickr

title="20191116_153840"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_153840"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080457212/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_153840"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080457212_9e1b1b84d3_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_153840"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Flickr

title="20191116_153911"><img src=" " width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_153911"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>" target="true"><a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/markcutright/49080456997/in/dateposted/" title="20191116_153911"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49080456997_4763b452af_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="20191116_153911"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

This is really for smaller things that are just moral boosters. Gum for hydration or to calm a kid down (yes, it's from an MRE), burn gel, lip balm, finger splint, band aids...just boo boos.

And gentleman, thats it. Super duper long post but I haven't been active around here lately and wanted to give you guys something to chew on. Maybe a starting place for some folks or a way to be a few %'s more effective if you're already carrying stuff.

This is not an end all, be all kit. It's made to get me home 20-25 miles from the house, of which I have at least a dozen bridges that could be down, at least one river to cross thats 140 yards wide, possible upheavel, but more than likely all of this will be used for every day occurances. I've breached a home because I couldn't pick the lock and it was cheaper to destroy the door than to call a locksmith. I've kept nasty messes from spreading, changed my tire, moved objects out of the road and a bunch of other pedestrian, every day things that were helpful.

Also, and not shown is something that rhymes with Schlock Plenty Twix, with a light and IWB pants. To feed it is a pair of Smeventeen round magozines in a handy dandy carrier because things happen.

At the end of the day, it's about solving problems, living with a budget, and getting home. I'm going to guess that everything pictured cost something in the neighborhood of $500. Nearly everything was bought on sale or surplus but it was all chosen because it was quality and it works.

Cheers,

Cutright

This topic was modified 4 weeks ago 10 times by Cutright

Quote
Sunshine Shooter
(@sunshine-shooter)
Engaged Member Author
2558 Brass
Challenges: emergency shelter challenge level 1
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 139
19/11/2019 3:27 pm  

Looks like you've really thought this one through!

"Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement"

progunmillennial.wordpress.com


Cutright liked
ReplyQuote
Cutright
(@cutright)
Member Community Founder
855 Brass
Challenges: emergency shelter challenge level 1
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 40
19/11/2019 6:01 pm  

@sunshine-shooter

I did a little bit. Once part of St. Louis starting burning in 2014 it reprioritized some concerns. We're pretty much on a huge fault here for earth quakes, experience flooding fairly regularly these days and on top of all that I go from being down town and as urban as can be to being in the sticks fairly regularly...I look at it like this, I have life, health, dental, vision, death, home and car insurance. Why not pack a little insurance. It costs very little when you amortize it and its immediately there if you ever need it.

Do you pack anything? If so, whats the thought process?


ReplyQuote
Sunshine Shooter
(@sunshine-shooter)
Engaged Member Author
2558 Brass
Challenges: emergency shelter challenge level 1
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 139
20/11/2019 5:23 pm  

@cutright I do have a little pack I keep in the cargo area of my car, but it could use some heavy revision.  I'm going to be looking at your list when I do so.

I'm planning on putting together a blog post on this very topic on Friday (trying to get the Thanksgiving travel-related clicks).

"Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement"

progunmillennial.wordpress.com


Cutright liked
ReplyQuote
Cutright
(@cutright)
Member Community Founder
855 Brass
Challenges: emergency shelter challenge level 1
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 40
20/11/2019 7:48 pm  

@sunshine-shooter

Right on.

It's been a while since I jumped over to your blog...probly need to do that.


ReplyQuote

Your Support Matters

The Everyday Marksman uses Ko-Fi to help fund our activities. If you like what you get here, then we'd appreciate your support. Supporting the site includes several perks you can't get anywhere else.
Buy a Round

\\\ Latest Articles

Thank you for coming by The Everyday Marksman. This site and its community are a labor of love. I hope you stick around for a while, and maybe even join us.

-Matt

\\\ Participate

COPYRIGHT © The Everyday Marksman

Adventure Awaits

+ Newsletter
+ New Content Alerts
+ Deals and Sales

Subscribe now

Let's Stay Connected

We can't Wait to Show You More

Please Login or Register