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Who is actually using a pistol red dot?  

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Matt
 Matt
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10/06/2019 7:33 am  

Is anyone out there doing this? I've not committed to it yet, but the trend definitely seems to be going that direction. I'm curious about any lessons learned or unexpected drawbacks/benefits there are to mounting a dot.

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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The2bricks
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16/06/2019 8:44 am  

I have have been training with one the past few months. The adaptation to the sight was different than expected. The height of the sight causes you to adjust your presentation to have the dot on target. Now it is as quick as iron sights. I still practice with both as my back up gun is irons only.  As I am an older shooter I like the red dot sight, but I definitely will keep up the practice with irons.


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Sunshine Shooter
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16/06/2019 9:34 pm  

I've got a fund for a dot + slide milling that I contribute to each paycheck.  Does that count?

"Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement"

progunmillennial.wordpress.com


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Matt
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17/06/2019 9:12 am  

Then interesting thing to me is how many times I see people complain about hinting for the dot. It seems like a pretty steep learning curve, honestly. I get that once it’s done, the increase in accuracy is great, but I wonder how many people who put the dot in their pistols are actually tackling that learning curve?

My understanding is also that the newer generation of dots, like the ACRO and SRO help with that since it’s easier to find the dot.

I also hear a lot of people saying that the SRO is for competition use, but nothing I can find on Trijicon’s site says that, and it also doesn’t jive with the fact that the SRO includes two night vision modes. I can’t think of any pistol matches where that would be a need.

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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Sunshine Shooter
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17/06/2019 9:29 am  

I think your question about people actually tackling the learning curve of a red dot is like anything else.  What percentage of people who buy something are actually trying to learn to be proficient with it?  Whether it's an RMR, SRO, or even an AR, the majority of people will get it to either look cool or 'check the box'.  At this point in time there are multiple people going around the country teaching red dot specific courses (Scott Jedlinski & Sage Dynamics that I know of), so if a person is 'hunting for the dot' then that's their own fault.  I don't know if the ACRO will have an easier learning curve than the RMR, but the SRO definitely should.  If the SRO turns out to be significantly easier to learn than the RMR and other previous generation dots, then that will only lead to more people learning to actually run their gear.

"Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement"

progunmillennial.wordpress.com


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Jordanb
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21/06/2019 9:33 pm  

I have taken to the red dot- specifically, the Trijicon RMR 07 on a Glock 43.  I am 50, and have been noticing the front site....well....disappearing, which is a bit disconcerting.  I had filed away the info that "red dots help with aging eyes" tidbit as interesting but not germane to me- until it was.

I have had a very uneventful time transitioning, and I feel that I own that ease of transition to Aaron Cowen of Sage Dynamics, who really made sure to drive home the point that when using a red dot, you MUST be target focused.

I recommend getting an RDS on a pistol- that same "holy crap, this really IS better than the way we have been doing it" feeling you had with a rifle is also there with the pistol.  In the relatively short time I have had it, I have noticed that I really focus harder on the fundamentals and my pistol shooting has cleaned up quite a bit.

Hope that helps, please let me know if I can help in any way!

Thank you!

Jordan


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Akm295
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01/07/2019 3:29 pm  

I found the below study very helpful when deciding whether or not to venture down the path of a pistol mounted red dot. I also have taken a number of classes with this instructor and his team. The TL;DR  is it can a be advantageous , but requires you to put in work to yield results. For me, it came down to budget and time. Irons make more sense for me at the moment.

Red Dot Study – Key Points

This post was modified 4 months ago 2 times by Akm295
This post was modified 4 months ago by Matt

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Matt
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01/07/2019 8:21 pm  

@akm295 Your post got caught in the moderation queue and it stripped the links. If you PM them to me I'll insert them again.

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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