The Everyday Marksman

Community Hub

\\\ The Forum

Dry Fire Routines
 

Dry Fire Routines  

  RSS

Akm295
(@akm295)
Engaged Member Member
1019 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 58
01/11/2019 4:45 pm  

Thought I would share an article from Todd Green's Pistol-Training.com website for those who are looking to expand on their dry fire practice. I recently was doing some digging on dry fire. I wanted to learn more about what I could be doing at home and how I should be going about doing it. I wanted to make sure I was on the right track to actively improve. I found a lot of good articles and info, but what I really wanted was a structured routine that was good to go that I could build off of. The article and routine has been helpful, so I thought I'd pass it along.

Anyone else have recommendations in this area?

Dry Fire Routine

This topic was modified 2 months ago by Akm295

Quote
Matt
 Matt
(@matt)
Practitioner Admin
11733 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 347
05/11/2019 9:52 pm  

I was hoping there'd be more chiming in on this one. I think there's a lot of value in devising a solid dry fire routine. I know Justin, from Revolver Guy, has a solid one down- and it showed at our range session a couple of weeks back!

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


ReplyQuote
Diceman624
(@diceman624)
Engaged Member Author
2004 Brass
Rank:
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 136
06/11/2019 6:40 am  

Well, at current I don't exactly have one.  However, when I was prepping for a CMP-style rifle match, I took a bulletin board, placed a small scale circle on it, and placed it on the far side of the main hallway in my apartment at the time.  I then practiced prone, sitting and offhand with my M1 from the opposite end of the hallway (~20-30 feet).

Internet reputations may be one thing, but cold hard data is another.


ReplyQuote
Akm295
(@akm295)
Engaged Member Member
1019 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 58
07/11/2019 11:15 pm  

@matt

Any chance you can link to it? 

ReplyQuote
JustinC
(@justinc)
Member Subject Matter Expert
693 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 32
25/11/2019 10:48 am  

@akm295

Sorry I'm late on this - I usually only check in every couple of weeks or so.

My program is less a skill-building/development program and more of a maintenance program. I am former SOF operator with a huge amount of pistol training. However, in the ten years since getting out I had gotten a little softer, a little slower, and a little lax. I noticed some of my shooting skills starting to deteriorate, so my first post of 2019 was a goal of 3,650 minutes of dry practice in 2019. That averages out to exactly 10 minutes per day. So far/so good - eleven months in and I'm a tiny bit ahead of my goal to this point.

My use of the "program" might be generous. I just focused the work where I felt it was needed. The first few months of the year were easy. I did a solid four weeks (as I recall - all my weekly reports are online on RevolverGuy) doing nothing but extremely mindful presentation, trigger control, and presenting without pressing the trigger (to disentangle these two actions)(most of the time when I draw I don't press the trigger).

After I had gotten my draw smoothed back out (or had a good head-start on it) I began working in other skills. Every single session, even ten months later, begins with 1 to 2 minutes of draw stroke, then goes into the focus skill. Skills I worked in blocks are:

  • Reloads - a combination of slide-lock and tactical reloads,
  • Malfunctions,
  • Strong-hand only draw/trigger,
  • Weak-hand only draw/trigger,
  • Strong-hand only reloads,
  • Weak-hand only reloads,
  • Strong-hand only malfunctions,
  • Weak-hand only malfunctions,
  • Shooting around left/right barricades,
  • Drawing/shoot/reload/malfunction clearance from unconventional positions (sitting, kneeling, supine, prone),
  • Drawing/shooting with a handheld light,
  • Shooting on the move - forward, backward, and laterally, and
  • Probably some other things I've forgotten.

Obviously that's not enough to cover an entire year, so I've done plenty of weeks working draw refinement, focusing on specific points of performance like seeing the gun faster or gripping the gun harder.

My main reasons for doing this are building automaticity and maintaining recency-of-experience. I wrote two really in-depth articles on Lucky Gunner a few years ago about dry practice - and more importantly about adult learning and myelinization of neural pathways - that talk about these concepts. I built my "program" around the idea of frequently practicing skills that I am most likely to need, or skills that are complex. Recency of experience helps your brain retrieve a skill faster and more soundly and the more complex a skill is, the more important recency of experience becomes.

Another goal is overcoming novelty. For example: my "sitting" sessions were "fired" from bar stools, a barrel chair, and outdoor chairs, from sitting with feet flat on the floor, up on the bar stool's cross bar, or with my legs crossed. During indoor sessions I "shot" from our kitchen table from all seats at the table, but with the target in the same place, forcing me to change body position, etc. If I'm in a restaurant and something happens behind me, I don't want it to the first time I've ever drawn and fired from that position, so I've tried to work in as many variables as possible. With 365 10-minute sessions you can work a LOT of different skills.

I do a lot of work with malfunctions and reloads because they are complex, but I do probably 100x more presentations because they are massively more likely - if I get into a life/death scenario I will 100% need to draw so i work it every time.

If you want to see what I've done this year just go to RevolverGuy, find any article titled "Dry Practice Report" and click on the "Dry Practice 2019" tag.

Hope that helps!

Justin

This post was modified 2 months ago by JustinC

Pete and Akm295 liked
ReplyQuote
JustinC
(@justinc)
Member Subject Matter Expert
693 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 32
25/11/2019 10:50 am  

@akm295

And at the beginning of 2020 I have two posts planned; one concerning some lessons learned from a year of dry practice, the other will be a year sketched out for someone who wants to do a year or dry practice.


Akm295 liked
ReplyQuote
Matt
 Matt
(@matt)
Practitioner Admin
11733 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 347
25/11/2019 11:13 am  

@justinc

Thanks for jumping in Justin! I really want to focus on pistol skills in the coming year, as it's something I've historically neglected, yet it's statistically the thing I'm more likely to need. I'd like to think I could jump into the presentation practice and such, but the truth is that I probably need to go to a formal training course that teaches those things first. I never learned it in the military, and there's only so much you can pick up from watching others do it.

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


Pete liked
ReplyQuote
JustinC
(@justinc)
Member Subject Matter Expert
693 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 32
25/11/2019 11:18 am  

@matt

If you want to link up again I'm happy to teach you everything I know!

That's a really important point; if you don't have the skills learned it's counter-productive to start myelinating poor technique.


ReplyQuote
Matt
 Matt
(@matt)
Practitioner Admin
11733 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 347
25/11/2019 12:24 pm  

@justinc

I'm game, though we probably need a spot that we can go for more than an hour at a time, lol

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


ReplyQuote
Akm295
(@akm295)
Engaged Member Member
1019 Brass
Challenges:
Rank:
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 58
26/11/2019 12:53 pm  

@justinc

Thanks for this Justin. This was the post I went looking for on your blog, but you are a victim of your own success. I had trouble finding this sort of info in all the tagged content. Looking forward to your 2020 articles on the subject too!


ReplyQuote

\\\ Latest Articles

Support
The Everyday Marksman

The Everyday Marksman is entirely funded by readers like you. We don't rely on ads, sponsors, or any other outside influence to run things. For the price of a box of ammo, you can help keep the lights on and the content flowing.
Buy a Round

Support
The Everyday Marksman

The Everyday Marksman is entirely funded by readers like you. We don't rely on ads, sponsors, or any other outside influence to run things. For the price of a box of ammo, you can help keep the lights on and the content flowing.
Buy a Round

\\\ Latest Articles

Thank you for coming by The Everyday Marksman. This site and its community are a labor of love. I hope you stick around for a while, and maybe even join us.

-Matt

\\\ Participate

COPYRIGHT © The Everyday Marksman

Adventure Awaits

+ Newsletter
+ New Content Alerts
+ Deals and Sales

Subscribe now

Let's Stay Connected

We can't Wait to Show You More

Please Login or Register