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Matt
 Matt
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03/09/2019 10:01 am  

With the emergency shelter challenge live, I wanted a place to show off the kits we’ve built for constructing emergency shelter.

Post away!

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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Cutright
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08/09/2019 6:17 pm  

For nearly a decade, from the age of 22 to almost 32, I slept almost always under a poncho hooch. Flying diamond or lean to or plow. I'd almost always tie off the hood to an over head support and get a little more loft in my humble commode...I mean abode. It was real shit for sleeping at times. One thing I never got into and it was one of the first things I had learned from the internet from Ranger Rick, was using two tent poles from corner to corner, crossing each other. It made for a very shallow dome, but the pay off was never there for me; I'd never want to pack in the collapsible poles to do it. Eventually I found that I never even used my poncho for rain gear, I relied on Gore-Tex for that, and it was just my shelter. I still rock it today when I'm packing light or have size requirements (in MO, we do a lot of "float trips" or kayaking on lazy rivers).

As I developed a taste for more comfortable arrangements, hammocks were introduced to me. I was fortunate enough to meet a man who, like most around here, is a genuine diehard in his pursuits. He had made about 10 hammocks at that point and was friends with folks who really knew their stuff. He needed a knife and I needed a hammock. We met up through a popular bushcraft site, liked each others craft so we set up a trade.

I share the above because, while not exactly an emergency shelter, the 10x10 tarp can be put up rather easily and in about 4 minutes provided you have a proper location selected. Once it's up, putting up the hammock is simple. With a 10x10, you've got plenty of room to change clothes, cook, stretch out, fit another friend, get your gear covered, etc.

::Edited::

I only had this photo as I didn't carry a cell phone into the woods with a camera on it until very recently...and I'm not humping a 3 pound DSLR camera to show folks what I do in the woods. Anyhoo, attached is what modern camp looks like...the only difference back in the day was it was smaller and in camouflage and on the ground.

This post was modified 2 months ago 2 times by Cutright

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Matt
 Matt
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08/09/2019 7:22 pm  

@cutright

Nice!

This is a pic of me messing with my hammock and 10x10 tarp late last year. It's nothing fancy or custom. It's a DD Frontier hammock with bug net along with a DD 3mx3m tarp.

This post was modified 2 months ago 2 times by Matt

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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Cutright
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08/09/2019 7:31 pm  

@matt

The improvements that have come along since hammocks went mainstream is amazing. They were kind of coming along with all the doodads as I made that trade but now, for what you can get for $200 is pretty amazing. I really don't know much about hammocks, I just got the one I got and an Eno Double Nester for more serious, lighter considerations. The one I have you can slip a sleeping pad or two in-between layers and it has 4 baffles on both side you can fill with insulation or just store stuff in. It has Blue Steel Dynabraid lines (names?)...some high tensile super line I was told. There's the whoopie slings and snake skins. The tarp is silnylon and has orange tie outs, but it has pockets in the reinforced corners to stash the lines in. Moral of the story, my setup is not the lightest thing, but it has tremendous sentimental value and a lot of nice considerations when it was made. Nowadays, I think a lot of that is standard though.

Not trying to derail your thread, but can you tell me about your hammock set-up? And to your threads original point, is it quick to set-up? I find my only real limitation is finding trees far apart with no blockage between them to be my biggest challenge.


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Matt
 Matt
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08/09/2019 7:36 pm  
Posted by: @cutright

@matt

The improvements that have come along since hammocks went mainstream is amazing. They were kind of coming along with all the doodads as I made that trade but now, for what you can get for $200 is pretty amazing. I really don't know much about hammocks, I just got the one I got and an Eno Double Nester for more serious, lighter considerations. The one I have you can slip a sleeping pad or two in-between layers and it has 4 baffles on both side you can fill with insulation or just store stuff in. It has Blue Steel Dynabraid lines (names?)...some high tensile super line I was told. There's the whoopie slings and snake skins. The tarp is silnylon and has orange tie outs, but it has pockets in the reinforced corners to stash the lines in. Moral of the story, my setup is not the lightest thing, but it has tremendous sentimental value and a lot of nice considerations when it was made. Nowadays, I think a lot of that is standard though.

Not trying to derail your thread, but can you tell me about your hammock set-up? And to your threads original point, is it quick to set-up? I find my only real limitation is finding trees far apart with no blockage between them to be my biggest challenge.

I wouldn't call this setup minimalist by any stretch. The hammock and tarp actually take up a sizeable amount of space, nearly as much as packing in a tent would have taken. I don't have whoopie straps for it, so I have to rely on good old fashioned knot skills (I prefer to tie each end with a zeppelin hitch). I'm not super practiced with it, but I'd say the hammock takes me about 5-7 minutes to set up.

The tarp setup is actually much closer to the shelter challenge. I run a single paracord ridgeline secured with a bowline/marlinspike hitch at one end and a trucker's hitch at the other. I pre-knotted a few prusik loops along the middle and attach the tarp tie offs to them with sticks for toggles. Then I run a few guy lines out to the stakes. My guy lines are all paracord with bowlines tied at one end and then I do an adjustable grip hitch at the other. In total, setting up this camp takes 10 minutes or so at a casual pace.

"Man is still the first weapon of war" - Field Marshal Montgomery


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Thank you for coming by The Everyday Marksman. This site and its community are a labor of love. I hope you stick around for a while, and maybe even join us.

-Matt

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