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Welcome to the very first postal match here at The Everyday Marksman. This first one is a simple, though challenging, course of fire. We’re conducting a five-position sequence at a distance of 25 yards, similar to the very first Marksman Challenge. 

I suppose that’s fitting. And, as a reminder, competing in this event earns you a Marksman Challenge badge.

Read on for the rules.

Course of Fire

For this match, we are using a single NRA A-32 target placed at 25 yards. The A-32 target is designed for NRA 50-foot Light Rifle competition. The center aiming dot is .218 inches, the 10 ring is .439 inches, the 9 ring is 1.187, 8 ring is 1.874, 7 ring is 2.656, and 6 ring is 3.374.

The target has six bullseye, with the center top designated for zeroing.

Official target for this postal match

You can purchase packs of 100 targets from any number of target printers. The going rate is about $14 per pack.

As a last resort, you can use a downloadable A-32 from Bison Tactical, but it may be more difficult due to the scaling.

Five-Position

After zeroing the rifle on the top-middle target, you will proceed to fire four shots at each other bullseye from standing, kneeling, squatting, sitting, and prone. 

Top-Left: Standing

Top-Right: Kneeling

Bottom-Left: Squatting

Bottom-Center: Sitting

Bottom-Right: Prone

Again, only fire four shots from each position. This requires only twenty rounds for a maximum possible score of 200. 

You should check and mark your target between each string to eliminate any misses that might have strayed into another bullseye (i.e. a missed standing string hits a ring in the squatting bullseye).

You have a maximum of two minutes per four-shot string. 

You may start each string from standing in the low ready position. Do do not have to stand up between each shot. When the timer starts, you will get into the required position, aim the rifle, and begin your string.

The best score wins the division.

Rifle Classes

Per the Postal Match rules, there are five divisions:

Centerfire Irons – Any centerfire rifle with conventional iron sights. 

Centerfire Optics – Any centerfire rifle equipped with a scope and/or electronic sight.

Classic – Any military centerfire rifle issued before 1946 in its “as issued” condition.

Rimfire Irons – Any rimfire rifle with conventional iron sights. 

Rimfire Optics – Any rimfire rifle equipped with a scope and/or electronic sight.

The rifles may be equipped with a shooting sling, but may not otherwise be rested on any external object like a bag, barrier, bipod, or similar.

Registration and Scoring

There is no fee to submit one target to this match, however, a small contribution is certainly appreciated. You may purchase a match entry via the shop on our support page.

Anyone who purchases an entry this way may submit additional targets, one for each division they want to compete in.

Scores will be submitted to the designated matches scoring group with our community at The Marksman’s Quarter

If you are not already a member of The Quarter, purchasing a match registration comes with an invite to join the appropriate group so you can participate.

Scoring is on the honor system. An official submission to the scoring group requires a class designation, a brief description of your equipment, date & time, and a detailed photo of the completed match target for scoring.

Additional photos, especially those recording times on a shot timer or app, are ideal supplements. Video submission of any quality is encouraged, if possible. An after-action report detailing your experience is also welcome.

Deadline

This match begins on July 1st 2020 and ends midnight (Eastern Standard Time) on Sunday, August 30th, 2020.

Matt

Matt

Matt is the primary author and owner of The Everyday Marksman. He's former military officer turned professional tech sector trainer. He's a lifelong learner, passionate outdoorsman, and steadfast supporter of firearms culture.
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Mark Carroll
Mark Carroll
Guest

Looks good. targets ordered. I shoot the CMP postal every quarter with a pellet gun, so this will be an added challenge with a rifle. Squatting will be new to me. I was happy to see the various categories for rifles. I might like to try my M1 carbine under the classic series, and maybe switch to a different rifle every quarter. The nice thing about 25 yards is that I can shoot the match on my property

Matt
Matt
Guest

Would an old Krag rifle that some douche cut the forearm back to make it look more sporting qualify in the “as issued” category? It’s otherwise unsullied.

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